Mike Vickers' Blog

September 19, 2019

Newton and Prorogation of the UK Parliament

Filed under: Bill of Rights, Boris, Brexit, Dictatorship, Gina Miller, History in the making, Law, Newton — derryvickers @ 7:13 pm

Isaac Newton in 1675: “If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of Giants.”.

Equally this applies to Law as it does to Mechanics.

So much is Case Law.

But with the Prorogation of Parliament by Johnson, there is too few Cases to build on other than the Bill of Rights 1688.

I note in his closing submissions, Keen said the judges should decline to become involved. “Whether it is dissolution or prorogation [of parliament], this is forbidden territory … It is a matter between the executive and parliament.

But this is a not possible as, as Parliament is not in session, the matter cannot be resolved ‘between the executive and parliament’

He continues “The applicants and petitioners are inviting the court into forbidden territory and an ill-defined minefield that the courts are not properly equipped to deal with.”

Nevertheless, the Bill of Rights 1688 provides for:

Dispensing and Suspending Power.

By Assumeing and Exerciseing a Power of Dispensing with and Suspending of Lawes and the Execution of Lawes without Consent of Parlyament

And can we expect Johnson now to tamper with:

Violating Elections.

By Violating the Freedome of Election of Members to serve in Parlyament

The real question remains, is the Executive above or subservient to the Parliament. Is the Executive ‘The Queen in Parliament’ and, even if so, the Bill of Rights states that ‘Exercising a Power of Dispensing with and Suspending of Lawes and the Execution of Lawes without Consent of Parlyament’.

We can only wait a see what the conclusions of Supreme Court comes up with. What ever verdict is arrived at we may hope that we can be able to, as Newton says, Stand on the shoulders of Giants for the future.

BTW Bill Jameson in today’s Scotsman suggests that if the Supreme Court cannot come to an agreed verdict it could appeal to the European Court of Justice.

April 24, 2019

The Last Supper Then and Now

Leonardo's Last Supper

Greta Thunberg talking with Caroline Lucas and Jeremy Corbyn at the UK Parliament on 23 April 2019.

Greta Thunberg should be encouraged to speak to the UK Parliament as a whole.

In any case, if Trump is allowed to speak to the UK Parliament in June (and I hope Bercow succeeds again in stopping him) then Greta should be invited to follow immediately afterwards.

 

March 29, 2019

The Antipodes – Jacinda Arderns

Filed under: Brexit, History in the making, Personal, World Class — derryvickers @ 10:48 pm

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/mar/29/jacinda-arderns-speech-at-christchurch-memorial-full-transcript

“And so to each of us as we go from here, we have work to do, but do not leave the job of combatting hate to the government alone. We each hold the power, in our words and in our actions, in our daily acts of kindness. Let that be the legacy of the 15th of March. To be the nation we believe ourselves to be.”

“To the global community who have joined us today, who reached out to embrace New Zealand, and our Muslim community, to all of those who have gathered here today, we say thank you.”

What more is there to say?

I make no apology for bringing the words of Jacinda Arderns to the fore again.

New Zealand is the Antipodes in more senses than one to what is happening in the UK now.

March 18, 2019

Bercow – is he The Last Playboy of the Western World?

Filed under: Brexit, Europe, History in the making, Ireland, Politics, UK Parliament — derryvickers @ 10:33 pm

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/mar/18/john-bercow-commons-motion-brexit-erskine-may

John Crace – two pages rather than his usual one.

It would all be hilarious if it wasn’t so serious; as of course was the Synge’s Last Playboy.

However more serious is

Rafael Behr

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/mar/18/john-bercow-brexit-moment-speaker-ruling

From Behr’s  last two paragraphs:

“It also retrospectively casts a darker, more terminal shadow over the decision a majority of them made to reject the deal last Tuesday. Might some Tories or members of the DUP have acted differently had they known it was May’s last shot at getting her deal through?

Certainly the prime minister’s strategy has depended on eliminating options, so that eventually MPs would conclude that the only feasible Brexit on the table was hers. For that to work, she needed to keep bluffing and keep raising the stakes. She didn’t realise that ultimately, in parliament, it’s the Speaker who runs the game. And now all bets are off.

 

BTW Why have all the best playwrights in the English Language been Irish

February 14, 2019

Babel – and addition

Filed under: Brexit, Europe, History in the making, Music, Politics — derryvickers @ 5:10 pm

I should have included in my last blog the display flashed up during the Babel piece

Brexit cannot be neutral

Not just Venezuela but equally true of Brexit

February 10, 2019

Elizabeth Warren runs for President of the US

Filed under: History in the making, Left Politics, USA — derryvickers @ 8:11 am

Here  she goes

If she achieves domination for the Democratic Ticket she will give Trump a run for his money

Lovely set of pictures

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2019/feb/09/elizabeth-warren-launches-2020-presidential-campaign

November 12, 2018

Armistice Day and Brexit

Filed under: Anna Soubry, Brexit, History in the making, In Our Time, War — derryvickers @ 8:07 am

I feel I had to say something on this Armistice Day.

I went to no church service, I only looked at the pictures on the web, but I did stand two minutes quietly alone at 11am.

Armistice dictates that at least we must be part of the Common Market, and I believe we should provide open access to Europeans to this country.

I find it totally ironic that on the Day we remember the horrific First World War that we, at the same time, struggle to leave the Europeans in the lurch; at this moment in time they need us as much as we need them. It was Churchill after the Second World War who enunciated the need for a Unite Europe; not just Magnanimity in Victory but a necessity in the hope that we don’t enter into a third world war.

I am not a Tory, but I have now a great deal of sympathy for Theresa May. She was given an excruciating hand by Cameron; yes, she needn’t have picked it up but in retrospect there was no one else. I can only hope that May can create something out of the ashes. Yes, a second vote would be best, but I worry that the people would be given anything coherent to choose between.

October 27, 2018

The Second Coming – WB Yeats

Filed under: Anna Soubry, Brexit, Europe, History in the making, Italian, Poetry, Politics, Yeats — derryvickers @ 10:06 pm

La Seconda Venuta

Girando e girando in allargamento gyre

Il falco non può udire il falconiere;

Le cose cadono a pezzi; il centro non può reggere;

La mera anarchia è sciolta sul mondo,

Il sangue oscurato marea è sciolto, e ovunque

La cerimonia dell’innocenza è annegata;

La migliore mancanza di ogni convinzione, mentre il peggiore

Sono piene di intensità passionale.

 

Per leggere il resto  della poesia vedere poesia la Seconda Venuta da W B Yeats

It’s an uncomfortable Truth but many now believe Brexit can’t be delivered – by Anna Soubry

Filed under: Anna Soubry, Brexit, Europe, History in the making, Ireland, Italian, Politics — derryvickers @ 9:50 pm
Per i miei amici italiani

È una verità scomoda, ma molti ora credono che Brexit non può essere consegnato.

Non mi fa piacere osservare il caos e la confusione dei negoziati Brexit. Non dubito che il nostro primo ministro abbia fatto della sua meglio per fornire il risultato del referendum UE e lasciare l’Unione europea.

Ma come molti ora vedono, non è solo molto più complesso e difficile di quanto si creda o sia stato detto, cercando di trovare un Brexit che soddisfa la domanda di molti che vogliono lasciare, pur garantendo la pace in Irlanda del Nord, è quasi, ma impossibile. Comitato di selezione dell’Irlanda del nord in Parlamento, i cui membri sono quasi esclusivamente sostenitori del congedo duro, ha prodotto una lunga e ponderata relazione su come evitare una linea duro tra l’Irlanda del Nord e la Repubblica.

Hanno concluso che non vi è alcuna tecnologia per risolvere il problema e ha riconosciuto l’importanza di assicurarsi che il vecchio confine fisso non ritorni.

La libera circolazione delle persone e delle merci attraverso il confine è fondamentale per il mantenimento della pace. È anche molto utile per le imprese in tutto il Regno Unito.
Quando lasciamo l’Unione europea, siamo impostiamo a lasciare l’Unione doganale e il mercato unico che permette quello che chiamiamo commercio senza attrito-che permette la libera circolazione.

La nostra adesione continua al mercato unico e all’Unione doganale è anche ciò che gli imprese britannici vogliono poiché sono fondamentali per fornire prosperità e posti di lavoro.

Ma il primo ministro e molti sostenitori di Brexit, in particolare in Parlamento, insistono che dobbiamo lasciare entrambi e fare qualche nuovo accordo commerciale con l’Unione europea.

Basato su un Blog di Anna Soubry

Regno Unito Parlamento MP

October 19, 2018

It’s an uncomfortable truth but many now believe Brexit can’t be delivered

Filed under: Brexit, History in the making, Politics — derryvickers @ 9:56 am

I am not a Tory but Anna Soubry has it right.

_______________

It gives me no pleasure to observe the chaos and mess of the Brexit negotiations. I do not doubt our Prime Minister has done her best to deliver the result of the EU Referendum and leave the EU. But as many now see, it is not only considerably more complex and difficult than anyone believed or was told, trying to find a Brexit that meets the demand of many Leavers whilst securing peace in Northern Ireland is all but impossible. Parliament’s Northern Ireland Select Committee, whose members are almost exclusively fierce Leave supporters, produced a lengthy and considered report on how to avoid a hard border between Northern Ireland and the Republic. They concluded there is no technology to solve the problem and recognised the importance of making sure the old fixed border did not return.
The free movement of people and goods across the border is critical to the maintenance of peace. It is also very good for business across the United Kingdom.
When we leave the EU we are set to leave the Customs Union and Single Market which allows what we call frictionless trade – that free movement. As you know I have argued and voted for both, notwithstanding the threats of de-selection, violence and considerable abuse.
Our continuing membership of the Single Market and the Customs Union is also what British business wants as they are critical to the delivery of prosperity and jobs. But the Prime Minister and many Leave supporters, notably in Parliament, insist we must leave both and strike some new trade arrangement with the EU.
You were promised such a deal would be sorted before we leave the EU next March. Those negotiations have barely begun and there will be no deal to implement in March. So, some “back stop” is needed to ensure there is no hard border in Northern Ireland until the technology is developed or some magical trade deal is agreed that confers the free movement of a soft border.
As we saw last weekend, the Cabinet and parts of my party can’t even agree on that back stop. The reason, I am sorry to say, is both stubbornness over “red lines” and ideology.
But there is also this, and it is an argument I admit is powerful. If we stay in some form of Customs Union and/or the Single Market, we have no say over the rules that would govern our trade – we would be a rule taker not a rule maker, even though we would be paying a lot of money in effect for membership of both. Many argue they voted leave to restore our country’s sovereignty (I don’t believe we ever lost it) but in any event, they make an important point.
We cannot walk away without any deal as the consequences would be profound and I do not see any prospect now of Parliament agreeing to any deal.
There was such a time but the Prime Minister failed to seize that opportunity and build a consensus which would unite our country.
The only solution to the mess and chaos in my opinion and amongst a growing number of colleagues, is a People’s Vote – to take this most important matter for decades back to you the people. That’s what I shall be marching for in London tomorrow. Let me know if you would like to join me.

I [Anna Soubry] asked the Prime Minister a question in the above terms on Monday and you can read it here and watch it here

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